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Hey Frank I Got A Question?

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Whitey
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Hey Frank I Got A Question?

#1 Post by Whitey »

What the hell is OPEC's deal? Gas is over 2 bucks a gallon and they are cutting production? Your pretty well intuned to stuff like this. Why the MADMAX "Who run Bartertown?" Master Blaster stance?
Is the world running out of gas or is OPEC being 1970's retro fuel hording ass clowns?
Let them call me a rebel and I welcome it, I feel no concern from it; but I should suffer the misery of demons were I to make a whore of my soul. (Thomas Paine)

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Frank S.

#2 Post by Frank S. »

OPEC decided to reduce production because crude oil prices were falling on international markets. And they're continuing their descent.
The reason we see high gas prices in the US has to do with infrastructure, just like last time.
There is in fact plenty of oil to go around, but not enough facilities Stateside to process it. So the picture is different here and overseas.
US energy companies are making huge profits at the pump on crude they bought fairly cheaply.
There is no incentive for them to invest in more refineries and processing plants, and the government is not going to call them on it.
People still drive their SUVs, regardless. They'd probably argue that it's extremely difficult anyway to find sites in the US to build such facilities, because of environmental concerns, and restrictive legislation.
B.S...
That would create jobs, and there are plenty of communities who'd welcome the opportunity.

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#3 Post by Ploggers »

Forgive my complete lack of knowledge on this but I thought you lads had lots of your own oil. Is that no longer the case?

Frank S.

#4 Post by Frank S. »

For the most part, it's imported. I'm certainly no expert in that business, but I believe we're always looking to secure new sources.
Africa may in the near future provide 15 to 20% of what we consume, while Russia and the Caspian sea region could allow us to reduce our dependance on oil from the Middle East.
During the food for oil program, France imported about 8% of what Hussein's Iraq produced, while the US imported 56%, for instance.
Some members of the administration such as Spencer Abraham (energy secretary), have pushed for the exploitation of Alaska's oil resources, to reduce dependancy on the ME, but the plan for development of Alaska is a huge porker which benefits energy companies at the expense of consumers and numerous States.
The administration's talk of researching alternative sources of energy was just talk. What the real-politik is looks like "security through diversity", ensuring that we can obtain oil from a number of places around the world.
God forbid we'd have to train consumers to think that driving a gas-guzzling SUV is not a right.

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#5 Post by Noz »

OK boys. What's your complaint?
Gas is over 2 bucks a gallon
It’s 73.5p a litre where I live. :o OPEC reducing production, increasing cost per barrel and the government tax increases will bump this price up again. When you get to our cost per gallon in the UK, then start complaining.

Have they put out the oil refinery fire yet?
There are are two kinds of people:

Those who say to god, "Thy will be done", and those to whom god says, "Alright then, have it your way".

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#6 Post by Whitey »

Noz,
The problem here in the US for the most part is we have very limited or no mass transit. It isn't uncommon for a person to live 40-100 miles in some instances from their job, we probably burn more gas than those in the UK due to distance. When I lived in California and was stationed at Pendelton I had to live 60 miles away from base because rent was unbelievable near the base. I'd put 120 miles a day on the road. 2 fill ups a week. Our oil issue's are non-sense. Bush needs to add OPEC to the Axis of Ebil. Again we have outside major and I mean major megalopolis cities have no mass transit. This is another major problem I have with our State Government. They need a train, won't do it though.
Let them call me a rebel and I welcome it, I feel no concern from it; but I should suffer the misery of demons were I to make a whore of my soul. (Thomas Paine)

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#7 Post by Tab »

Whitey ole chum, over here petrol is about 8 dollars a gallon, now I can understand the need for cars in the States, but do they need to drink a gallon every eight miles. The modern compact as you call it can run for ever these days and if you have five or six gears then you wont be wasting what is becoming a valueable rescource.

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#8 Post by Whitey »

Tab I agree, compact is good. I drive Saturns. The thing is US drivers and their Militarized SUV's combined with their aggressive driving habits fuel the fear of many into buying big cars they don't need. You don't want to get hit by a Civi Hummer for instance in a Geo Metro. Our DOT has been sleeping too long on these issue's. Our traffic problems, under funded construction and lack of puplic transportation is sad for a "Developed" country. Like I said, price combined with distance driving has fuel prices making life uncomfortable.
Riding a bike to work or school in most moderately sized American cities is suicide, road rage drivers will turn you into road kill. It just sucks Tab, you have been here you've seen it. 2 bucks is cheaper than most places, but 12 years ago gas was like 89 cents a gallon. Why? Your country I wouldn't think wuld require you to drive long distances, but then again I don't know I don't live in the UK or never been there for that matter. Here you are forced to drive. In my town you can't hardly even walk anyplace due to lack of side walks and insane drivers who think traffic signals are just decoration. Only time I see people obeying traffic laws is when a cop is around, other than that full throttle and damned anyne who gets in the way. I hate my city.
Let them call me a rebel and I welcome it, I feel no concern from it; but I should suffer the misery of demons were I to make a whore of my soul. (Thomas Paine)

Frank S.

#9 Post by Frank S. »

Whitey summarized it pretty well. I'll only add a couple points.
Consumers buy SUVs not for the safety factor but for the agressive image. The trend got started by Schwarzenegger when he cajoled the makers of the Humvee to make a civilian model. He loved the Humvee. Other brands jumped on the bandwagon, and voila.
For the most part, SUVs are useless off-road and unsafe on the road. High-end models from Germany and Japan have better passive and active safety standards.
But they're a minority. The trend is now car-based SUVs which handle better and crash better, but again, most of the models out on the road give a false sense of security.
About a year ago, I saw the aftermath of a collision between a Hummer H2 and a '70s Chevy Monte Carlo. The H2 was in pieces and the roof gone.
And they do guzzle gas to the tune of 9 to 10 miles per gallon in city driving, for the bigger ones.
I would not own a sub-compact car either. I've been in two crashes driving sub-compacts which resulting in injuries I would not have sustained in a larger model. Life's full of compromises. I choose to drive a large sedan with V8 which gets 16 mpg in the city and 25 on the freeway, a car which has a very good passive safety record.
I look admiringly at Honda and Toyota models which return 30 mpg and more, but the size is wrong. For me anyway.

Guest

#10 Post by Guest »

PongoLogs wrote:Forgive my complete lack of knowledge on this but I thought you lads had lots of your own oil. Is that no longer the case?
PL, they have now, they have a 51st state, Iraq :D

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#11 Post by minimac »

Noz wrote:OK boys. What's your complaint?
Gas is over 2 bucks a gallon
It’s 73.5p a litre where I live. :o OPEC reducing production, increasing cost per barrel and the government tax increases will bump this price up again. When you get to our cost per gallon in the UK, then start complaining.
Its 82.9p near me!! Where are you??
T

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#12 Post by Noz »

I'm down in sunny Gosport. :( From me going to work in the morning, and going home in the evening and filling up, the price had gone up a penny a litre :o This inflation stuff is scary. The sooner I get on my little motorcycle the better.

If you travel to where I work (in Alton) it is 89.9p a litre. 30 miles. That is bad :fist:
There are are two kinds of people:

Those who say to god, "Thy will be done", and those to whom god says, "Alright then, have it your way".

C.S. Lewis

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#13 Post by Sully »

For the most part, it's imported. I'm certainly no expert in that business, but I believe we're always looking to secure new sources.
No s**t Sherlock :o (in a similar vein to bootneck's comments :wink: )
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#14 Post by Pasha »

Having lived for a number of years in an American suburban town, I can whole-heartedly endorse Whitey's analysis that to be a non-driver effectively renders you a non-person. Everything from employment to grocery shopping is almost entirely geared to those with a car. Moreover as Whitey has pointed out, there is a stunning lack of any form of public transport worthy of the title.

Reading Frank's last piece reminded me of conversations with American friends about their choices in cars. Like you Frank, they all based their selection on the assumption that they would suffer a car crash at some stage and I remember thinking that not even Istanbul taxi drivers were that fatalistic.
Regards!

Pasha
"To subdue the enemy without using force, is the acme of skill" Sun Tzu.

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#15 Post by Guest »

Pasha, I have driven in the states, Pensylvania, Florida etc, and generally i think the standards of driving are shyte. I can see the side of the coin where they all think that they will be in an accident sooner or later, but you would have thought that they would have a harder driving test, which means that you`ll hopefully be a safer driver on the roads. Another thing with regards to engine size, some of those things they drive have huge lumps in them, big time gas guzzlers. We all know its a ferking big country, but how many Americans do the whole nine yards? ie, state hopping, i doubt its all those who have the big cars/SUV`s etc, so why don`t they bring the size of the engine down, and thus save on fuel and, (tree hugging mode kicks in) save the environment. :wink:

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