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Differences Between Military and Civillian Jumps

Discussions about those units who make up The Parachute Regiment.
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got1
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#16 Post by got1 »

RSO3, That was a cracking film :o I have never seen so many bad exits on a film, they were getting twists inside the aircraft. some of the bits with the kit coming off was really bad. You wouldn't like to be on the DZ when that lot was coming in.
It would be interesting to find out how many heads and arms they found on the ground. I've seen blokes "counting the rivets " before, but nothing like that.

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Tab
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#17 Post by Tab »

Now if you can't jump out of the plane carrying your kit then what are doing as a paratrooper. The number is saw that just fell down onto the floor and pushed them selfs out makes you wonder at the quality of the men

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#18 Post by JayCam »

I thought that myself. If you made an exit like that on a civy jump you would be immediately grounded until you could be retrained then most likely you would be shoved back to an earlier point in the program.. not to mention getting bollocked by every single instructor on the DZ.

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#19 Post by RSO3 »

All up weights for paratroopers are largely ignored, because despite what the RAF say, you can't just leave all your spare radio batteries or your ammunition behind becasue it's heavy. I put the video in to illustrate a point - how military jumping is different to civillian.
No matter how well trained you are or how strong you are, trying to walk down a bucking aircraft with 120lb bergan strapped to your legs, and a heavy parachute on your back and a reserve on your chest is no mean feat. I've seen good soldiers struggle to get out the door because they physically can't move properly in the first place. Before criticising too many of those yanks, just spare a thought for all the signallers and support weapons boys who jump with extraordinary weights strapped to them.
As for the yanks on the film who had sh1te drills with their static lines, then they deserve to be unhooked before their next jump.
Get Awaaaaaaaaaaaay

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#20 Post by JayCam »

Point taken mate. Never thought of it like that.

J.

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#21 Post by Tab »

RSO3.....I can see you have never jumped from a Velletta...there used to be a bloody great wing spar about 2 foot high that went across the centre of the plane, now try climbing over that with full kit on.

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#22 Post by got1 »

In earlier aircraft (pre herc) you would not have got away with a lot of those exits. In particular the ones where there static lines were all over the place, if you were lucky you would have got away with a "strop burn", if not it would cut your throat (capt in the 7 RHA mid 60s).
I have seen some heavy loads used, mortars, mmg's (vickers) sigs etc. and seen them hobbling out the door, but you were so close to the man in front you were held up by them. My most akward load was a 3.5 rocket launcher but I could rest it on the floor to get the weight of my shoulders.
The picture with the blokes hand on the door, he had to stop himself missing the door and ending up in the bog.

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#23 Post by 81mm »

the percs of jumping with the mortars was that in general you were at the front of the stick, jumped with an 84 ( carl gustav) once, was 34 in the stick and my container weighed 138pounds, they were all weighed prior to the jump. when all the containers were loaded on the herc we got a call to get them all back off again, something to do with the wedge? so we stood in stick order as the pji handed out the containers throught the jump doors, when it came to mine, 2 of them picked it up, struggled with it, and said fxxk that, it was the only container out of 90 that was left on the herc. was in rag order waiting to jump, and just managed to get out of he door, with the help of the pji, also jumped with the rangers and they could not belive the weight that we carried, ie 3 days kit, as they are used to getting a resup asap. also nice to see the rifle coy boys when they had to jump with greenies, moaning txxxs.

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#24 Post by Tab »

got 1.......The reasons that the doors on the later aircraft were all over the place was to stop paratroopers being swept around the back of the aircraft in the slipstream and colliding our their parachutes getting entangled. I was one of the people that did the parachute acceptance work with the Beverly at RAF Station Boscombe Downs on Salisbury Plain and when doing a mass drop this is one of the first problems we encountered, and it was even more fun when you used all three exits at once, two from the side and one from the boom. We were doing three to four drops a day for two weeks while we were down there.

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#25 Post by AcUk »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEJvvpCBZdY

At the beginning of this video it has some Para's jumping.
The rest shows some footage of them training.

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#26 Post by harry hackedoff »

This is a good thread 8) Top dit there 81 :P
Lying on me back on a DZ in Sennybridge, watching as 2 Para jumped in, I was well impressed by the Toms with the barrels and baseplates :o
You should try skiing with the eighty-four mate, it`s dead forking easy :o
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#27 Post by got1 »

That jump was "clean fatigue", different kettle of fish.Cushy.

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#28 Post by Noz »

I always loved the balloon jumps, the silence of it all and when you jumped watching the earth come towards you, it was as if I was standing still and every thing was coming towards me
No balloon any more. Skyvan for training jumps.

Stood in the balloon fully kitted as an observer. PJI wouldn't let me jump. "More than my jobs worth" he said. Trials of being a woman!

Seen numerous jumps. Only one I saw from the back of the aircraft was from a Chinook.

Saw one jump at Otterborne which was only the second jump to require HUPRA. One lad got himself in a terrible state coming out of the door (clean fatigue). Herc had to go round in circles to prevent him getting too badly bashed against the fuselage. :o
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#29 Post by got1 »

Did quite a few from the Wessex, just like a balloon jump with noise.
You all sit on the floor and shuffle forward on you arse then sit in the door with your legs hanging out.
Smashing, as long as the bottom of your chute clears the door when you go out, otherwise you get a different view :lol: .

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#30 Post by neil1955 »

The most alarming difference is the hundreds of other mentally challenged loons in the air at the same time dancing on your canopy etc...
The Brecon Becons still stand Pen-y Fan is still a pain it makes no differance jnr, snr, selection, it stays with you ............

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